Using Your Website for Creating and Maximizing Resources

Written by Josh Tiensivu in Marketing

In this entry of our series on turning your website into a marketing hub for your business, our focus is on maximizing resources. We want to consider both your target audience and your internal team. Ensuring that all of your marketing materials are available and easily accessible on your website is only part of the picture. It’s critical for your brand to think carefully about how your website is built, what features it needs (or does not need), and who on your team is responsible for its management.

You can think about the front- and back-end of your website as two sides of the same coin. Many of our clients come to us with websites that do well on one side but have room to grow on the other. In order to serve its role as your business’s marketing hub, the goal becomes to utilize your web presence as both an internal and external resource. We will explore how bringing both sides of your web presence into harmony with each other adds value to all stakeholders.

Maximizing Your Internal Resources Through Better Web Development

Develop a lean website

Think through and reduce the number of steps in your internal systems. At Classic City, we believe that auditing the back end of your website can be a low-cost investment for both your brand and your entire team. And of course, there’s increased site speed.

Keep your website easy to manage

An easy-to-edit website helps keep marketing efforts simple. We know how hard your marketing team already works on creating content. Your website can help expand production output and maximize both company and personal time. Further, using unreliable tools in conjunction for data collection can mean missed sales opportunities and a mismanaged pipeline.

Draw a direct line between your audience and your team

When a potential client reaches out to us through our website, our sales team gets a Slack message. This includes their complete form submission and which page they were viewing at the time they decided to reach out. For us, that means a phone notification, which means no missed connections.

Maximizing the Resources Available to your Website Audience

Create value for your users and your sales team

Housing all of your marketing materials on your website. A significant portion of your audience may not be ready to make a purchasing decision. At this stage, many buyers wish to do their initial research without directly contacting every brand they look into. Capture this audience by anticipating their needs and providing what information they are looking for.

Focus on consistent branding

Think, “If I were to put my content into a physical book, would it read cohesively?” While we have been emphasizing that your website should be more than a static brochure, that does not mean it should not advertise or speak to your target demographics. Consistent branding is certainly a priority in any marketing endeavor and it is especially important for impressing the audience you may not get to speak to directly.

Provide easy to read materials

Unless your niche is acting as an outlier in your vertical, there’s probably no reason to reinvent the wheel with your layouts. Using technically sound graphics and web design makes your messaging easier to digest, which we believe provides more value than standing out to be different.

Maximizing Your Marketing Opportunities With Intentional Content

Write content for real people with real needs

No matter what the algorithms want digital content creators to do, the search engines are not buying from your business–real consumers are. Write content for people. Specifically, write content for the people who genuinely need your brand’s product or service. Avoid appealing to a marketing strategy and hoping that you convert the right percentage of traffic in order to achieve your revenue goals… focus on providing value and the rest will follow.

Ensure your messaging is in tune with your vision

Last week we wrote about using your website to share your brand’s vision with your audience. Let’s say you run a landscaping service that gives a portion of profits to reforestation and your website devotes significant space to your charitable efforts. If this copy is high-energy and engaging, your additional content should follow suit. If you were to post a guide on DIY lawn maintenance over the winter, it should feel more personable than a 10-item list without an introduction.

Bringing it all together

We hope we’ve put our money where our mouth is and that the information above has been valuable. Rethinking your website as a marketing hub and stakeholder resource can mean revisiting all of your internal processes and external communications. If this feels daunting, Classic City can help. Reach out to us to learn more about how we help brands save time and maximize the value of their online resources through site audits, hosting and website management.